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The effect of a combination of 0.1% octenidine dihydrochloride and 2% 2-phenoxyethanol (octenisept®) on wound healing in pigs in vivo and its in vitro percutaneous permeation through intact and barrier disrupted porcine skin

Jessica Stahl, Michael Braun,Joerg Siebert and Manfred Kietzmann
 
A combination of 0.1% octenidine dihydrochloride and 2% 2-phenoxyethanol (octenisept®) is a commonly used disinfectant in human medicine. As porcine skin represents an adequate model for human skin, the effect of octenidine dihydrochloride and phenoxyethanol on wound healing is studied in pigs. Furthermore, the in vitro percutaneous permeation of the test substances is studied. The impact of the test formulations on wound healing is examined (A) under non occlusive conditions and (B) in comparison to another disinfectant based on povidone-iodine under occlusive conditions, while wounds are treated daily with the test substances. The percutaneous permeation of octenidine dihydrochloride and phenoxyethanol is studied in Franz-type diffusion cells with intact skin as well as barrier disrupted after tape stripping. Compared with povidone-iodine or vehicle treatment as well as untreated control wounds the treatment of wounds with the test formulation has no influence on the healing rate in pigs and does not induce retardation of wound healing. The in vitro diffusion experiment reveals that octenidine dihydrochloride is only detectable in the acceptor chamber of three-barrier disrupted skin samples. Phenoxyethanol permeates through intact porcine skin in amounts of 11.3% and through barrier disrupted skin in amounts of 43.9%.